Tomorrow I'll be attending the 3rd Annual Streamy Awards at the Palladium in Hollywood with one of the series I produced, Anyone But Me!  Anyone But Me is nominated for 3 Streamys this year:

  • Best Drama Series
  • Best Writing: Drama - Susan Miller & Tina Cesa Ward
  • Best Female Performance: Drama - Rachael Hip-Flores

Watch live tomorrow, February 18th, at 3pm to catch the winners and live performances!  I'll also be cheering on many colleagues including Bernie Su and his show, The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, and the creators of PrisonPals, Tim Stone and Jackson Juliani, who flew in from Australia this week (Prison Pals score by Rob Gokee). Don't miss it!


I have always been fascinated by experimental films or at least the idea of them.  As an artist and a filmmaker I am drawn to stories that examine what makes us human.  How we interact with each other.  What makes us angry, sad, inspired, brave.  I love films that explore the human condition.  I also think that through different processes we can learn more about ourselves and in turn we can become better people in a more compassionate world. I remember reading In the Blink of an Eye by Walter Murch before I ever went to college. I always loved telling stories in this visual medium but I had never thought about it from this perspective.  Why does a film have such an effect on us?  Why does this medium work?  Murch writes, "from the moment we get up in the morning until we close our eyes at night, the visual reality we perceive is a continuous stream of linked images." There was brilliance behind his text. I wanted to make films that were extensions of our reality. I agree when he says, "the perfect film is as though it were unwinding behind your eyes, and your eyes were projecting it themselves, so that you were seeing what you wished to see.  Film is like thought.  It's the closest to thought process of any art."

While I watched my share of artsy and experimental films in college I really didn't find one that spoke so clearly to me until I watch Dogville by Lars von Trier at the Sedona International Film Festival in 2004.  This minimalistic film, segmented by chapters and plot points telling us what was about to happen, opened my eyes to a way of storytelling that more closely resembled theatre than film.  Shot in a void with only a few walls of a set and a handful of props, great acting and a very powerful story, it pulled me in, horrified me and left me wanting to understand how he pulled it off.  Now, Lars von Trier is known for his Dogme95 films and this one did stray from the rules a bit however it was unlike most of the films I had seen up to that point.  Von Trier stated, "My supreme goal is to force the truth out of my characters and settings."  There is a lot about his Dogme95 manifesto that resonates with me and has remained in my head since.  I could go on and on about this but the point of this musing is to get us to why I'm involved with 42 Seconds of Happiness.  And there is a connection.

Thankfully because of social media and the webseries world I met Susan Miller and worked with her on Anyone But Me.  Being connected with Susan online allowed her colleague, Christina Kallas, to somehow happen upon my blog.  I'm not sure what it was that she saw on my site that compelled her to contact me - I suppose I could ask her - but all I know is what she saw, felt, experienced on my site was a clue for her.  I was the right person to pull into the world she created around 42 Seconds of Happiness.  

42 Seconds of Happiness is a scripted & improvised, narrative feature filmed cinéma vérité style.  If you don't know what that is think of it as an experiment where our actors all arrive at a location in character and live/interact in that state for a duration of time while guided by Christina Kallas through scripted plot points.  We'll shoot around the action as unobtrusively as possible.  There will be no cutting, no takes, no tweaking the lighting, no make up or wardrobe.  It will be us filming "real life" as it unfolds.  Our own version of Dogme95 if I may be so bold as to compare our film to other films of this sort. 

Of course as a producer I'm always looking at things from two perspectives.  The logical side of my brain said 'Oh no, a film that we love but with no funds in place. A huge challenge.'  The right side of my brain pushed back and said, 'Of course we're going to do this. It will be hard. It will be an uphill battle. But it must be created.'  With no money but a cast and a creator 100% behind the idea of this film after the series, I joined the team and brought my friend and talented director of photography, Jorge Luis Urbina into the fold.  

What have we agreed to?  Well, I've agreed to help pull this film through the fundraising process even though I feel I am close to exhausting my network on such endeavors.  There are so many campaigns out there on IndieGoGo and Kickstarter and I have asked for support on numerous projects already.  I know I'm asking the world... but I can't help but try.  Jorge and I have looked at the film's budget from a very unconventional perspective.  We're ready to shoot this with little to no resources but a few things have to happen.  We need a location to shoot, sound equipment and a sound mixer, and we need to be able to feed our cast and crew for the length of our shoot. Our absolute minimum budget for this is $5,000.  Yeah, it's nuts, I know.  A feature film for $5,000??   I would have been the first person to tell you that it can't be done.  And I did.  But you know what?  It can.  But only if people care and if we get some help from like-minded people.  So far we have 55 donors and for that I am extremely grateful!  The stark reality of our situation is however that we need more.  Either a few hero donations in the thousand dollar range or many smaller donations.  

Yes, this is a film that has no place in the world of studio films but it's a film that has a ton of heart and has the potential to reach a wanting audience.  So I implore my friends, family, colleagues, and far-reaching network online to lend a hand or a couple of dollars to this small but ambitious film.  Our fundraising campaign ends tomorrow night at midnight, Sunday February 3, 2013 at 11:59pm PST.  And we have improv-inspired perks that I feel are very unique and worthwhile. 


Other things you can do: If you know of a farm-house, bed and breakfast, inn or the like that can sleep up to 15 people in the NY/NJ/Conn area please let me know.  If you have a few bucks to spare, please donate.  If you have a network of people, please help us spread the word.  

This film is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the purposes of this Alliecine Production must be made payable to Fractured Atlas (via IndieGoGo) and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.


When we talk about filmmaking we normally talk about 3 stages: pre-production, production and post-production. All very important stages, however, there are things before and after these 3 stages that make or break a film's success: development and distribution.

Luckily for the Love in the Time of Monsters producing team, we had a successful development process which included testing the waters at The American Film Market in 2011. We asked questions, pitch our "in development" film to 50 distributors and took in all the insight and tips we could get.

This year with post-production in its final weeks, we set off to the 2012 American Film Market at the Lowes Santa Monica Hotel with a kick-ass sizzle reel of our soon-to-be-completed film. The relationships we forged last year paid off and we now have distributors and agents alike vying to see the completed film. So what's next? Finish the film, hopefully screen at a large festival and sell the film to the highest bidder. I can't wait.


When a mission goes wrong two former special forces soldiers race to uncover the hidden truths in the war on terror.  

Please take a moment to watch our video which is a part of our IndieGoGo Campaign to raise money for the development of the film American Terror.  Click here to read more about it and donate.  Only a few days left - campaign ends December 2nd! 

We greatly appreciate your contributions which help employ veterans of the United States and support those who have fought for us, those who continue to fight for us and their friends and families.

Meet our Veterans

 Joseph Anderson "Warren"

Brian Majestic "Sheppard"

If you haven't done so yet, you need to watch Cost of Capital Season 1 in its entirety.  Why you ask?  Because it's a great series (if I may say so myself) that is not only entertaining but also educational. Created by Brian DeChesare of Mergers & Inquisitions, the series is paired with infographics that outline the inner workings of the deal that takes place in the show. Who is each character? Who do they work for? What do they want? How do they benefit from the deal?  You may just learn a little something about the investment banking world. 

So don't wait:

42 seconds of happinessI was recently introduced to writer, Christina Kallas, via Susan Miller (Exec. Producer/Writer of Anyone But Me).  Christina founded and runs the Writers Improv Studio in NYC among the million other things she does (and I thought I was insanely busy!)  One of the projects she's developing is called 42 Seconds of Happiness, improvisations on love if you will.  In short, Christina took her fully developed screenplay, gathered a group of talented actors and loosely guided them on a journey through the story via improv and threw a camera into the mix - recording it from within the story.  This project is just now being released online as a webseries.  When you see the episodes you'll see raw footage of real emotion.  And it's going multi-platform.   As the next chapters unfold you'll see social media and technology play a part.  Additionally, you'll see a feature film develop.  Christina explains 42 Seconds of Happiness here:

This is about love and creation. How can you love when you fear losing? How can you create when you fear being rejected? It all boils down to the same question. And if fear is part of the equation, then you love and create focused on the result, and for the wrong reasons: to get approval and security. Approval and security is what fortune and fame are for, and it is also what relationships and marriage are for. It's all about fear - you are separate from me, you are separate from the other. What happens when you do that? You lose. It's a never-ending cycle.

Improv is the only way to get out of this cycle. Improv is about letting go, about accepting, about being in the moment. There is no past and no future, and we stop controlling. There is no right or wrong, and we stop fearing. There is no you or me, and we are one. 42 Seconds of Happiness is that moment when we are in the moment.

We record every step since the beginning of this project. We are broadcasting this development process, as a web series made from these improvisations, even the camera is part of the improvisation.  We launched on September 1st, 2012 and will continue broadcasting the improvs until the movie is released. One of our fans has described it as watching “real people going through real stories in their real lives.” Honestly, that is the biggest compliment for me.

I'm intrigued, inspired and jumping in feet first.  I'm excited to work with Christina on this project and look forward to experiencing the story as it unfolds into the feature film we're shooting in the new year.  

For the film version of 42 Seconds of Happiness, we're bringing on a Director of Photography and a sound team which the webseries do not have (due to the necessities of something Christina calls "emotional doubling"). We will still however, respect and work within the improvisational process and philosophy which is important to this project - the closest we can think of in terms of films already made is the aesthetic/look and feel of films  The Celebration or In Your Hands.  

Here's a trailer for the webseries (below).  We hope you check this and the episodes as they release online!  Subscribe to the YouTube channel here.

We welcome and encourage your support by following, liking, and sharing information about this project with your friends and family.

Official Site:





I'm in production with TBC Films up in the redwoods with limited phone and internet access We're shooting away and it's been amazing! To keep up on a daily basis with the goings on for Love in the Time of Monsters see Uncle Slavko's Fun Time Blog. I've been blogging away lately over there under the alias "Andy Gunn." You know, one of the producers who mysteriously disappeared but not before giving me his login info...ha!

For a taste, check these out!

Don't Worry, We're Alive!

A Tale of Two Days

Come See Bigfoot!

Who Works for Uncle Slavko?

And one of the Video Blogs narrated by me, Allison Vanore and created by Ben Turner: Swampy Scowly


Over the last year I've had the pleasure of working with Susan Miller and Tina Cesa Ward twice on their award-winning webseries, Anyone But Me.  Last month I flew to New York to produce the finale episode of the show (running over 20 minutes in length) with the core cast and a lot of the same crew who has been with the show from the beginning, four years ago.  

The finale production was both exciting and sentimental.  With half of the cast and myself arriving from Los Angeles it felt like a reunion.  At the same time it was bittersweet.  We all knew that after those three amazing days of shooting the last bit of the show would be in the can.  Luckily, we were able to make the final scene of the finale the final scene we shot.  I'm not going to lie, there were tears.  But there wasn't a better place to shed those tears than sunset at Battery Park, the place where the show began, down the street from the World Trade Center (now the Freedom Tower) and with a fantastic view of the Statue of Liberty.  

So take a moment to check out the series (if you haven't already) and then enjoy the final installment of the show that has changed lives around the world.  Thank you, Tina and Susan, for allowing me to be a part of this show. 


There is no one way to find funding for your project.  Whether it's donations or investments that you're after, people still need to know the same thing.  Who are you?  What is your project/story?  What's your project's goal?  What is the budget?  What is the timeline?  And, what am I going to gain from this?  The answers all vary but this is what makes your story unique and important.  

Last year, you may remember, we produced the TACOathon.  This was an eight-hour fundraising live stream to raise money for two projects: A Boy's Life (short film) and Replaced Series (indie TV pilot).  I, Allison Vanore (Producer of both projects) and Rob Gokee (Music Composer for Replaced) went head-to-head raising money and eating tacos.  Every $50 donated to one of the projects would mean that rep would have to eat a taco.  Now this may seem strange, crazy or just plain stupid HOWEVER that day we raised close to $2,500 total for the two projects.  That's more in one day than any other day we were fundraising.  Why did this work?  It's because Rob and I have a large, supportive network online and offline, Rob also has a reputation for being taco obsessed and we can stream from our home for 8 hours without much technical support.  

What do you need to produce a TACOathon?

Graphics to support the show (Taco Count Photos for Twitter and Facebook)

Chat Room Moderator (Krista Vanore)

Twitter and Facebook Updater (Diane Beck)

A Guest Interview per Hour: Vianessa Castanos, Jamie Fishback, Alicia Ying, Robb Padgett, Heath Vinyard, Sheila Daley, Laurie Records, and Eli Benavidez (all of whom have a large social media presence and network to draw from)

Taco Ingredients prepped and ready to cook

Laptop w/ a built-in camera (and internet connection)

UStream Channel

Promotion to your networks at least a week prior

IndieGoGo Campaign

After our show aired we had a few friends and acquaintances try something similar.  One of which Rob actually took part in: The Destructathon (raising money for Hollywood Wasteland).

There's no wrong way or right way to raise money.  They key is, be creative, think out of the box and do what your network, friends and family will find entertaining.  We knew that our networks would pay money to make Rob eat tons of tacos.  And they did.

To watch the TACOathon, visit our YouTube Channel.

Gasp!  I've been going non-stop since before the holidays and realized that I've been a bit off the grid because of it.  Well, I'm still here.  Busier than ever but coming up for a breath of air before the next round of productions.  So what have I been doing?  

November started with a video job for Prolacta BioScience, a company who takes breast milk donations from mothers with excess, processes and fortifies the milk and then provides it to hospitals and doctors for premature babies.  The videos I produced are "How To" videos for donor mothers to walk them through the steps of becoming a milk donor.  We had a great two day shoot and a quick post schedule.  Our cast was awesome: Chenoa Mitsui and Tanya Ihnen.  Also, huge props to our team including Maura Concannon (Director), Jorge Urbina (DP), Eli Benavidez (Script Supervisor), and Moira Taylor (Hair & Make Up)! 

In December, we went into production on the drama, "Cost of Capital," a new webseries created by Brian DeCherase, produced by Goldie Chan and myself, Allison Vanore, and directed by Jorge Urbina.  We had an ambitious 9 day shoot and rocked it out just before the holidays.  We're now well into post-production.  I can't wait to get these episodes online for you all and especially for Brian's investment banker audience!  

Literally within 24 hours of landing in LA after the holidays on the East Coast I was back on set.  This time for a feature horror film by Todd Johnson and Mike Campbell, The Rental.  We shot for 3 weeks with a small but very talented cast: Kimberly Browning, Mike Campbell, Ashley Love, Leah Verrill and Tiffany Walker.  Our crew was amazing and included some who I've worked with before: Frederick Snyder (1st AD), Erin LeBre (Make Up, SFX, Hair), Moira Taylor (Make Up SFX, Hair), Mike Halper (Sound), etc. And I met some new people: Rick Greenwood (DP), Mohnish Sawaswat (Gaffer) and their teams.  Now Todd is going to hybernate for a few months editing and creating the VFX for the film.  At some point he's going to emerge to hand over the edit to music composer, Rob Gokee.  For more updates about the film check out the Facebook Page and follow on Twitter!

Now there's more to do so I'll be updating you about that soon.  Happy New Year!